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Profile photoYou're reading the blog of Vincent Cabansag.

Second Week of Code Academy

The second week of Code Academy was intense and full of new material. We had more instruction on the MVC model, routing and an introduction into database integration. Pairing and pitching would sum up my week.

Pairing
Some of my best learning experiences have been from pair programming. Whether it’s during class or with my mentor, pair programming has been engaging, collaborative and social. I’m going to make a concerted effort to do it more. This week I had the opportunity to pair with two other Code Academy students, Jin Hwang and Jean Bahnik. Jin and I like to rebuild apps that Jeff Cohen creates during class. It’s a great way to test yourself as you must blend your knowledge of Ruby syntax with MVC concepts. Jean Bahnik and I had a great pairing on Thursday as we solidified our knowledge of routing and database administration through the rake command. We even played around with stylesheets to polish our app.

I had a wonderful pairing with my mentor, Corey Haines, this week. He showed me how to seed data into my SQLite3 database and we took a good look at compiler error messages and what they mean.

This week has taught me that I should pair program frequently.

Pitching
Bernhard Kappe, founder and CEO of Pathfinder, came to speak to us about the Business Model Canvas and Lean Start-up practices. It’s great to get coached on the finer points of building a business and making it work. I think it’s important to have the ability to take a step back from software development, look at your product from a high level and see if it’s a viable business. I love the concept of Kaizen, where you must continuously improve and evolve your practices, and the process of Genchi Genbutsu, where you gather facts yourself so that you can make the right decisions quickly. I read Business Model Generation by Alexander Osterwalder last year and it is a must read for anyone working on an MVP.

This week I also pitched my business idea to the class, which went reasonably well. I used one of my older pitch decks, but I was more focused on creating presence, story telling and shaking off the cobwebs of group speaking. I wish there was more time for me to field questions because I love critical questions that challenge my business model, assumptions or expertise.

Looking forward to pitching again and recreating my pitch deck with Prezi—a quick thanks to Michael Verdi for showing me that!

I’ll be rolling out my Ruby on Rails version of this blog this week. So look for it soon!

Back to all blog posts

Second Week of Code Academy

The second week of Code Academy was intense and full of new material. We had more instruction on the MVC model, routing and an introduction into database integration. Pairing and pitching would sum up my week.

Pairing
Some of my best learning experiences have been from pair programming. Whether it’s during class or with my mentor, pair programming has been engaging, collaborative and social. I’m going to make a concerted effort to do it more. This week I had the opportunity to pair with two other Code Academy students, Jin Hwang and Jean Bahnik. Jin and I like to rebuild apps that Jeff Cohen creates during class. It’s a great way to test yourself as you must blend your knowledge of Ruby syntax with MVC concepts. Jean Bahnik and I had a great pairing on Thursday as we solidified our knowledge of routing and database administration through the rake command. We even played around with stylesheets to polish our app.

I had a wonderful pairing with my mentor, Corey Haines, this week. He showed me how to seed data into my SQLite3 database and we took a good look at compiler error messages and what they mean.

This week has taught me that I should pair program frequently.

Pitching
Bernhard Kappe, founder and CEO of Pathfinder, came to speak to us about the Business Model Canvas and Lean Start-up practices. It’s great to get coached on the finer points of building a business and making it work. I think it’s important to have the ability to take a step back from software development, look at your product from a high level and see if it’s a viable business. I love the concept of Kaizen, where you must continuously improve and evolve your practices, and the process of Genchi Genbutsu, where you gather facts yourself so that you can make the right decisions quickly. I read Business Model Generation by Alexander Osterwalder last year and it is a must read for anyone working on an MVP.

This week I also pitched my business idea to the class, which went reasonably well. I used one of my older pitch decks, but I was more focused on creating presence, story telling and shaking off the cobwebs of group speaking. I wish there was more time for me to field questions because I love critical questions that challenge my business model, assumptions or expertise.

Looking forward to pitching again and recreating my pitch deck with Prezi—a quick thanks to Michael Verdi for showing me that!

I’ll be rolling out my Ruby on Rails version of this blog this week. So look for it soon!

Back to all blog posts

Second Week of Code Academy

The second week of Code Academy was intense and full of new material. We had more instruction on the MVC model, routing and an introduction into database integration. Pairing and pitching would sum up my week.

Pairing
Some of my best learning experiences have been from pair programming. Whether it’s during class or with my mentor, pair programming has been engaging, collaborative and social. I’m going to make a concerted effort to do it more. This week I had the opportunity to pair with two other Code Academy students, Jin Hwang and Jean Bahnik. Jin and I like to rebuild apps that Jeff Cohen creates during class. It’s a great way to test yourself as you must blend your knowledge of Ruby syntax with MVC concepts. Jean Bahnik and I had a great pairing on Thursday as we solidified our knowledge of routing and database administration through the rake command. We even played around with stylesheets to polish our app.

I had a wonderful pairing with my mentor, Corey Haines, this week. He showed me how to seed data into my SQLite3 database and we took a good look at compiler error messages and what they mean.

This week has taught me that I should pair program frequently.

Pitching
Bernhard Kappe, founder and CEO of Pathfinder, came to speak to us about the Business Model Canvas and Lean Start-up practices. It’s great to get coached on the finer points of building a business and making it work. I think it’s important to have the ability to take a step back from software development, look at your product from a high level and see if it’s a viable business. I love the concept of Kaizen, where you must continuously improve and evolve your practices, and the process of Genchi Genbutsu, where you gather facts yourself so that you can make the right decisions quickly. I read Business Model Generation by Alexander Osterwalder last year and it is a must read for anyone working on an MVP.

This week I also pitched my business idea to the class, which went reasonably well. I used one of my older pitch decks, but I was more focused on creating presence, story telling and shaking off the cobwebs of group speaking. I wish there was more time for me to field questions because I love critical questions that challenge my business model, assumptions or expertise.

Looking forward to pitching again and recreating my pitch deck with Prezi—a quick thanks to Michael Verdi for showing me that!

I’ll be rolling out my Ruby on Rails version of this blog this week. So look for it soon!

Back to all blog posts